What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?
What Is An Endocrinologist?

A medical practitioner who specializes in diagnosing and treating glandular disorders such as hyperthyroidism and diabetes is known as an endocrinologist. Endocrinology is one of the most family-friendly medical specialties since patients are usually seen during normal business hours and practitioners are not required to deal with emergencies.

Job Description

Endocrinologists diagnose and treat disorders of the endocrine system, which includes the pancreas, pituitary gland, testes, ovaries, thyroid, and adrenal glands, with patients referred by their primary care physician. Reproduction, growth, metabolism, and bone health all rely on the endocrine system. Endocrinologists evaluate symptoms, conduct diagnostic tests, and provide treatment plans. They may work with other doctors and healthcare providers.

Education Requirements

Education Requirements
Education Requirements

Starting with a bachelor’s degree, becoming an endocrinologist takes years of specialized study. Despite the fact that there are no official degree requirements for entrance to medical school, most candidates major in biological sciences, chemistry, or mathematics as undergraduates. Medical school admission is difficult; most students have a 3.7 or higher undergraduate grade point average, and some have postgraduate degrees.

Medical school is a full-time, four-year program that involves lectures, lab work, and monitored clinical rotations in a variety of specialties. Those who want to specialize in endocrinology after graduating must first finish a three-year internal medicine residency and then a two- to three-year residency in the speciality.

To practice, all doctors must be licensed by a state licensing board. Although board certification is not required, it is preferred since it shows a high degree of professional knowledge and competence. Before taking the test to become board certified in the specialty of endocrinology, endocrinologists must first acquire board certification as doctors of internal medicine.

Endocrinologists must remain updated on medical research in order to provide the best care to their patients. Medical schools, major medical facilities, and professional organizations all provide continuing education.

About the Industry

Endocrinologists usually treat patients in an office or clinical environment for 30 to 50 hours each week. Part-time work is more common among female endocrinologists than male endocrinologists. Primary care physicians send patients to endocrinologists, who may then refer them to a surgeon for a condition such as a pituitary tumor. Endocrinologists may work in research labs, teach at medical schools, or oversee endocrinology residents during rotations.

Years of Professional Experience

Years of Professional Experience
Years of Professional Experience

Endocrinology is one of the lowest-paying medical specialties. Nonetheless, the typical median income for practitioners is $219,592, with half earning more and the other half earning less. Salary is influenced by a variety of factors, including geographic region and board qualification. Salary ranges from the following, depending on experience:

  • Less than 1 year of experience: $199,086–$215,407
  • 3–4 years of experience: $200,342–$216,663
  • 7–9 years of experience: $203,690–$219,592
  • 15–19 years of experience: $214,570–$233,104
  • 20+ years of experience: $216,663–$235,806

Job Growth Trend

Demand for doctors, especially specialists such as endocrinologists, is projected to increase considerably faster than average when compared to other jobs, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. This trend is fueled by advances in medical research, as well as a rise in the population and diabetes cases.