The Most Common Types Of Criminologists

Criminology is one of the subfields of sociology. It includes the scientific review and analysis of crime, criminal behavior, corrective actions, criminal evidence investigation, psychological and genetic reasons of crime, investigative techniques of crime, criminal convictions, and various modalities of punishment, rehabilitation, and corrections. 

Criminologists are interested in the nature of crime and offenders, the origins of criminal law, the etiology of crime, the societal reaction to crime, and the operation of law enforcement agencies and correctional facilities. In general, criminology investigates three lines of inquiry: first, the nature of criminal law and its administration, as well as the conditions under which it develops; second, the causation of crime and the personality of criminals; and third, the control of crime and the rehabilitation of offenders.

Qualified criminologists can work in a variety of settings, including commercial and public agencies, federal, state, and local government agencies, and educational institutions doing research and teaching. In this article, we will explore more about this specialized career and its diversion into different working areas in today’s society.

4 Common Types Of Criminologists

Federal Law Enforcement Criminologist

Federal Law Enforcement Criminologist
Federal Law Enforcement Criminologist

Criminologists seeking jobs in federal law enforcement like The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), will need a greater degree of education and professional experience than those seeking employment at the local level. The first step in becoming a law enforcement criminologist is a bachelor’s degree in criminology paired with criminal justice or a post-baccalaureate certificate in criminology and criminal justice. This job entails assisting crime victims from all walks of life.

Legal Criminologist

Legal Criminologist
Legal Criminologist

A legal criminologist will apply knowledge of politics, economics, sociology, and psychology to better understand lawmaking, public safety, and lawbreaking. Criminologists look at different aspects of crime, such as criminal conduct, why a crime was done, and how crime changes through time. A legal criminologist will use data to study, analyze, investigate, acquire information, and solve problems; people to assist, advise, convince, negotiate, and manage; and ideas to plan, start, develop, and communicate.

Forensic Criminologist

The education and training criminologist profile is appropriate for a variety of criminology job positions. Criminologists who work in universities may do research and teach criminology, law, sociology, and legal studies. Criminologists can work as full-time faculty, instructors, associate professors, assistant professors, professors, or lecturers. Education and training criminologists can also work as consultants, researchers, and policy advisers.

Education and Training Criminologist

Education and Training Criminologist
Education and Training Criminologist

A forensic criminologist is a sociologist who specializes in the investigation of criminal behavior. Studying the causes and effects of crime; identifying economic, sociological, and psychological characteristics that cause people to commit crimes; seeking ways to better understand why people become criminals; studying crime prevention methods; and testing methods to reduce people’s inclination toward crime are all part of the job profile. Forensic criminologists work with federal, state, and local government agencies to assist with crime scene investigations. They also work in juvenile detention facilities, jails, and mental health facilities.