Geneticist And The Story About This Unique Science Career (Part 2)

As we have known in the previous blog article about the Basic Information of Geneticists, a geneticist is a scientist who examines genes and how they are passed along, modified, activated, or deactivated. They frequently investigate the role of genes in illness and health.

Some other necessary information about this career has been reviewed like workplace, job task, and salary. All of those can tell that Geneticist is a very appealing job offer to consider, especially with the post graduates, who are seeking good opportunities for stability and high income in the science field. 

In this continuing part, we will continue our investigation into this special career, with deeper facts and stories related to the job market and further resources.

Market Demand

Geneticists Market Demand
Geneticists Market Demand

The number of geneticists in the United States is presently estimated to be 38,700. Between 2016 and 2026, the geneticist employment market is anticipated to expand by 8.0 percent. The United States has the tendency to require 9,500 geneticists during the next ten years. The database is presented according to the addition of 3,100 new geneticists and the retirement of 6,400 current geneticists.

Qualifications and training required

A degree is required to work as a geneticist. Biomedical science, biology, microbiology, genetics, and biochemistry are all relevant life science degrees. A postgraduate qualification, such as a master’s degree, is also prevalent. A PhD is particularly beneficial, and may even be required, if you wish to direct your own research initiatives or become a university instructor.

Scientific training programme
Scientific training programme

If you wish to work as a geneticist in the NHS, you must first finish the scientific training programme (STP). Scotland has its own training programmes, which include a three-year STP or similar program.

Upon finishing the STP, you can apply to the Academy of Healthcare Science for a certificate of achievement. You will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a result of this (HCPC). To work as a clinical scientist in the United Kingdom, you must be registered with the HCPC.

Health and Care Professions Council
Health and Care Professions Council

If you have completed an HCPC-approved course, you will be automatically eligible to apply for registration; however, you will need to pay a fee for the HCPC to process your application, as well as a registration fee, which is reduced by half if you graduated from an approved course within the last two years.

Career Opportunities

Because many genetics professions are rooted in health care, employers often include hospitals, pharmaceutical firms, and universities. However, possibilities exist in the food and beverage sector, the health and beauty care industry, and research and consultancy firms.

Career Opportunities
Career Opportunities

Consider prospects in biological sciences-related businesses such as biotechnology, biomedical research, agriculture and horticulture, conservation, and environmental assessment. It is also feasible to apply your abilities in sectors such as education, business, finance, and retail.

Work Experience

Career development and placements in the laboratory or field may improve your chances of finding genetics-related work. It’s also beneficial to learn about the various approaches utilized in the field. Some programmes provide the chance to spend a year working in industry or at a research facility, or to do a shorter work placement in the UK or overseas.

It’s a good idea to acquire some experience in both industry and academics so you can compare the two and determine which is best for you. Temporary work in a healthcare sector, such as a hospital, may also be beneficial in helping you explore career options.