5 Surprising Facts About Zoologists

A zoologist is a scientist who studies the life, origins, and behavior of animals in the wild and in captivity. They frequently travel long distances to study different species in their natural habitats, which include rainforests, deserts, and isolated regions. Zoologist is a perfect role for animal lovers. They play a critical role in safeguarding endangered animal populations as species respond to climate change and human impact.

Get to know more about zoologists

Specialization

A zoologist is typically also a mammalogist, herpetologist, or ornithologist, to mention a few of the zoology specialties. It may be daunting to try to examine every animal, insect, or fish, given the number of species and the level of research zoologists conduct. Instead, zoologists focus on the animal kingdom’s smaller categories. This enables them to concentrate their research and studies on comparable animals, resulting in more helpful and insightful findings.

Specialization
Specialization

Well-educated individuals

Zoologists must have earned their bachelor’s degrees, which are generally in biology with zoology or related coursework as a specialization. This allows zoologists to work in entry-level roles, while higher-level employment needs a zoologist to complete graduate study to the level of a master’s degree.

Zoologists are well-educated individuals
Zoologists are well-educated individuals

A PhD is usually required for zoologists who specialize in independent research or college teaching. During their schooling, zoologists are required to get a comprehensive scientific foundation that includes not just biology but also botany, physics, and chemistry.

Variable working conditions

Zoologists work in the field, in universities, in offices and in laboratories. A zoologist’s main responsibilities include studying animals and their interactions with their environment, whether in the wild or in captivity, as well as collecting data on the features and development of different species through research and experiments. A zoologist may be involved in species population management, public wildlife awareness initiatives, and producing surveys and reporting for wildlife authorities in addition to these duties.

A springboard for other occupations

For those wanting to pursue graduate study in another subject, an undergraduate degree in zoology might be a good foundation. Zoologists have many careers to follow. They can pursue careers as veterinarians or biologists by continuing their studies. 

A springboard for other occupations
A springboard for other occupations

Because zoology students take classes like molecular biology and organic chemistry, the degree can also be beneficial for individuals wanting to go to medical school. Some zoologists go on to work as ecologists or environmental scientists once they finish their studies.

It isn’t a large field

In the U.S, zoologists are quite a small field. In 2010, there were around 20,000 zoologists and wildlife biologists working, the majority of them were employed by a government organization or university. Between 2010 and 2020, an estimated 5,900 new jobs are predicted to be created, resulting in a slower rate of increase than the national average.